Morning Edition

Weekdays, 6am - 8am

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Space
3:44 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Ripples In Space Could Point To The Universe's Beginnings

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 4:24 am

Physicists say they've discovered a faint signal from just moments after the universe began. If confirmed, it could revolutionize our understanding of the cosmos. But not everyone is convinced.

U.S.
3:44 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Decades Later, A Medal Of Honor For Hispanic-American Hero

Santiago Erevia is one of only three living soldiers receiving a Medal of Honor on March 18. Behind him is a photo projection of his younger self in uniform.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 10:26 am

At the White House on Tuesday, President Obama will award the Medal of Honor to two-dozen soldiers whose service ranged from World War II to the Vietnam War. These soldiers are being commemorated after congress mandated a review to make sure that no one was overlooked because of prejudice.

One of them is Santiago Erevia, who risked his life on a May afternoon in 1969, charging toward bunkers held by the North Vietnamese.

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World
10:59 am
Mon March 17, 2014

A Closer Look At U.S. And EU Sanctions In The Ukraine Conflict

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, as Eleanor just told Renee, the government in Kiev says the world is with them and not with Russia.

This morning, the White House and European countries announced new sanctions against Russian and Ukrainian officials over their role in Crimea. Joining in our studio to update us is NPR's Michele Kelemen. Michele, good morning.

MICHELE KELEMEN, BYLINE: Nice to be here.

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Business
5:27 am
Mon March 17, 2014

Clothing Retailer Lands End To Split From Sears

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 10:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with a split for Lands' End.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: Lands' End, the outdoor clothing retailer, will spin off from Sears Holdings Corporation next month and operate as a standalone, publicly traded company.

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Around the Nation
5:27 am
Mon March 17, 2014

Young Mathematicians Hope They've Calculated Winning NCAA Bracket

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 10:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Aspiring high school mathematicians gathered in New York for March Mathness. Even for kids who don't love sports, the professor leading the event told The Times there are a billion reasons to love brackets this year: Warren Buffett's reward for picking the winners for all 67 NCAA games. The math geeks are hoping linear algebra and complex computer codes will help them beat the odds: 9.2 quintrillion to one. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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