Morning Edition

Weekdays, 6am - 8am

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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NPR Story
4:04 am
Thu April 24, 2014

Small Businesses Fight Big-Box Stores By Specializing

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 6:21 am

As online and mega stores take up more of the retail landscape, small mom-and-pop shops are getting more specific. We examine one of the ways small stores are looking to survive and possibly thrive.

Around the Nation
6:10 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Florida School Offered Kids Caffeine On Test Day

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 7:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Some stores post a warning: Disobedient children will be given and a puppy and an espresso. Maybe that's not so bad. Kids at a Melbourne, Florida elementary school were given caffeine. Each kid was offered trail mix and Mountain Dew on the morning of standardized tests. A grandmother got the school to stop, but the principal says she read a study on keeping kids' energy levels stable. By the way, Creole Elementary is rated an A+ school. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Animals
6:05 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Canadian Police Extricate Bear From Jar

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 7:02 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

Winnie the Pooh is often found head-first in a jar of honey. For a bear in Canada, birdseed was too much to resist. Residents in Sudbury, Ontario spotted a bear stumbling down the street, unable to see where it was going, because a large jar of birdseed was stuck on its head. It even bumped into a police car. The cops, you will be happy to know, got experts there to sedate the bear and cut the jar off its head.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

NPR Story
4:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Haagen-Dazs Experiments With Veggie Ice Cream

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 7:02 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Our last word in business is: Veggie Ice Cream.

Japanese parents trying to get their kids to eat vegetables can skip to desert.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Haagen-Dazs is testing vegetable-flavored ice cream in Japan. Flavors include tomato cherry and carrot orange.

Education
4:23 am
Wed April 23, 2014

In Tulsa, Combining Preschool With Help For Parents

Shartara Wallace picks up her son James, 4, from preschool in Tulsa, Okla.
John W. Poole NPR

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 7:02 am

At preschools in Tulsa, Okla., teachers are well-educated and well-paid, and classrooms are focused on play, but are still challenging. One nonprofit in Tulsa, the Community Action Project, has flipped the script on preschool. The idea behind its Career Advance program is simple: To help kids, the group believes, you often have to help their parents.

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