Ron Elving

Ron Elving is Senior Editor and Correspondent on the Washington Desk for NPR News, where he is frequently heard as a news analyst and writes regularly for NPR.org.

He was previously the political editor for USA Today and for Congressional Quarterly. He has been a Distinguished Visiting Professional in Residence at American University, where he is now an adjunct professor. In this role, Elving received American University's 2016 University Faculty Award for Outstanding Teaching in an Adjunct Appointment. He has also taught at George Mason and Georgetown University.

He has been published by the Brookings Institution and the American Political Science Association. He has contributed chapters on Obama and the media and on the media role in Congress to the academic studies Obama in Office 2011, and Rivals for Power, 2013. Ron's earlier book, Conflict and Compromise: How Congress Makes the Law, was published by Simon & Schuster and is also a Touchstone paperback.

During his tenure as the manager of NPR's Washington coverage, NPR reporters were awarded every major recognition available in radio journalism, including the Dirksen Award for Congressional Reporting and the Edward R. Murrow Award from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

In 2008, the American Political Science Association awarded NPR the Carey McWilliams Award "in recognition of a major contribution to the understanding of political science."

Ron came to Washington in 1984 as a Congressional Fellow with the American Political Science Association and worked for two years as a staff member in the House and Senate. Previously, he had been state capital bureau chief for The Milwaukee Journal.

He received his bachelor's degree from Stanford University and master's degrees from the University of Chicago and the University of California – Berkeley.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: We mentioned that we've been collecting songs from you that sum up how you've been feeling about this election, and there is one song that has been submitted more than any others. In fact, more than all the others combined. And I guess it's fitting coming out of that conversation about election anxiety. (SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "IT'S THE END OF THE WORLD") R.E.M.: (Singing) It's the end of the world, as we know it. It...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: Let's go back to NPR's Ron Elving, still with us in studio here in Washington, D.C. Ron, briefly, what is the biggest issue for the campaigns now? RON ELVING, BYLINE: The biggest issue for the campaigns now is turnout. We have had months of talking about issues such as immigration and trade and national security. But at this point, with all the arguments having been made in the debates in the past - three of them...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. RACHEL MARTIN, HOST: We're not going to know the results of the election until Tuesday night - we hope, anyway. That doesn't stop us, however, from trying to predict the outcome of this presidential race. At this point, you may have heard a lot about bellwethers. For a little background on this, we now go to Professor Ron. That would be NPR's senior political editor Ron Elving. RON ELVING, BYLINE: OK. Bear with me now. We're going to...

Here's a little information that Americans have usually been able to ignore. It's about the Electoral College, a uniquely American institution that's been with us from the beginning and that's occasionally given us fits. Typically, the Electoral College meets and does its thing a month or so after the election, and few people even notice or care. Once in a while, though, people do notice and do care — a lot. Will 2016 be one of those years? It's not something reasonable people would hope for,...

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump had one job in his third and final debate with Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton: break out. He needed to break out from the narrative that is fast enveloping his campaign — the way evening overtakes the late afternoon. He needed a breakout performance showing himself to be disciplined and knowledgeable enough to be president. And he needed to break through the lid that has settled atop his sizable base of strong supporters, containing that bloc...

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