Liz Halloran

Liz Halloran joined NPR in December 2008 as Washington correspondent for Digital News, taking her print journalism career into the online news world.

Halloran came to NPR from US News & World Report, where she followed politics and the 2008 presidential election. Before the political follies, Halloran covered the Supreme Court during its historic transition — from Chief Justice William Rehnquist's death, to the John Roberts and Samuel Alito confirmation battles. She also tracked the media and wrote special reports on topics ranging from the death penalty and illegal immigration, to abortion rights and the aftermath of the Amish schoolgirl murders.

Before joining the magazine, Halloran was a senior reporter in the Hartford Courant's Washington bureau. She followed Sen. Joe Lieberman on his ground-breaking vice presidential run in 2000, as the first Jewish American on a national ticket, wrote about the media and the environment and covered post-9/11 Washington. Previously, Halloran, a Minnesota native, worked for The Courant in Hartford. There, she was a member of Pulitzer Prize-winning team for spot news in 1999, and was honored by the New England Associated Press for her stories on the Kosovo refugee crisis.

She also worked for the Republican-American newspaper in Waterbury, Conn., and as a cub reporter and paper delivery girl for her hometown weekly, the Jackson County Pilot.

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It's All Politics
12:44 pm
Wed July 11, 2012

Romney Absorbs Boos, Tells NAACP That Democrats Have Failed Blacks

Mitt Romney speaks at the NAACP annual convention Wednesday in Houston.
Pat Sullivan AP

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 2:02 pm

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney didn't expect a warm embrace when he took the stage Wednesday at the NAACP annual convention in Houston.

And he didn't get one.

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It's All Politics
4:09 pm
Tue July 10, 2012

Intriguing Opportunity, But Some Risk For Romney In Speech To NAACP

A sign at the NAACP annual convention in Houston, where Mitt Romney is scheduled to speak on Wednesday.
Pat Sullivan AP

Originally published on Tue July 10, 2012 4:30 pm

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's planned speech Wednesday at the NAACP convention in Houston comes at a precarious time for the nation's African-American community.

-- The unemployment rate among blacks is north of 14 percent — more than 5 points higher than the national average.

-- Opponents of GOP-led efforts to require voters in about a dozen states to show identification say the voter ID laws could disproportionately disenfranchise legal black and Latino voters.

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It's All Politics
4:38 pm
Fri June 29, 2012

Opponents Of Secondary Provisions In Health Care Law Look To Lower Courts

A demonstrator protests outside the the Supreme Court Thursday in Washington, D.C.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Sat June 30, 2012 12:45 pm

When the Supreme Court upheld the central tenet of President Obama's health care law, it meant that several lower court fights on other aspects of the sweeping legislation can move forward.

Those cases, including high-profile lawsuits by Catholic organizations challenging the law's contraception coverage rules, would, obviously, have been affected if the court had found the individual mandate unconstitutional or struck down the law in its entirety.

But with the law intact, the lawsuits — many of them held in abeyance pending the high court's decision — will proceed.

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It's All Politics
12:16 pm
Thu June 28, 2012

Legal Scholars React: 'Many People Were Stunned'

Courtesy Columbia

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 5:08 pm

In the most anticipated and politicized Supreme Court ruling since Bush v. Gore, which decided the 2000 U.S. presidential contest, the high court on Thursday let stand, in a 5-4 decision, the centerpiece of President Obama's health care legislation.

Chief Justice John Roberts, providing the deciding vote and writing the majority opinion, laid out the rationale, which says that Congress under the Commerce Clause does not have the authority to require people to buy insurance — but it does have the authority to tax people who do not have coverage.

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It's All Politics
10:18 am
Fri June 22, 2012

Bloomberg Pollster Defends Survey Showing Obama With Big Lead

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 11:46 am

Bloomberg pollster J. Ann Selzer ignited something of a political firestorm this week when her national survey for the news organization showed President Obama leading GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney among likely voters by 13 points, 53-40 percent.

Most recent polls have shown the race much closer.

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