Jim Zarroli

Jim Zarroli is a business reporter for NPR News, based at NPR's New York bureau.

He covers economics and business news including fiscal policy, the Federal Reserve, the job market and taxes

Over the years, he's reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders and Ponzi schemers. He's been heavily involved in the coverage of the European debt crisis and the bank bailouts in the United States.

Prior to moving into his current role, Zarroli served as a New York-based general assignment reporter for NPR News. While in this position he covered the United Nations during the first Gulf War. Zarroli added to NPR's coverage of the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, the London transit bombings and the September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center.

Before joining the NPR in 1996, Zarroli worked for the Pittsburgh Press and wrote for various print publications.

Zarroli graduated from Pennsylvania State University.

When news broke Friday that the FBI had discovered emails that might be pertinent to its investigation of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, stock prices suddenly took a tumble . The decline can be explained by an unusual development in this year's long, contentious presidential campaign, says Eric Zitzewitz, a professor of economics at Dartmouth College. For the first time in history, the financial markets seem to prefer the Democratic candidate for president over the...

Some of the country's most prominent economists have signed a letter warning that Donald Trump is a "dangerous, destructive" choice for president and urging voters to choose someone else. The letter , first reported by The Wall Street Journal, was signed by 370 economists, including eight Nobel Prize winners. The text stops short of endorsing Democrat Hillary Clinton, though, and doesn't criticize Trump on ideological grounds. Instead, it says he has made repeated statements aimed at...

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If presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump were consumer products, they wouldn't exactly be flying off the shelves, according to a firm that studies brand loyalty. The Reputation Institute , which gauges how consumers view companies, politicians and even countries, gives Republican nominee Trump what it calls an overall "pulse score" of 31.7. Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton rates a bit better, at 38.7. Any score less than 40 qualifies as having a "poor reputation," the...

Wells Fargo's board of directors is trying to determine whether to claw back pay for top executives in response to the scandal involving unauthorized customer accounts, The Wall Street Journal reported. The Journal, citing a source familiar with the matter, said the bank wants to resolve the issue before CEO John Stumpf testifies before the House Financial Services Committee on Thursday. A spokesman for the bank refused to confirm or deny the report. Earlier this month, Wells Fargo said it...

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