Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer who currently works on The Two Way, NPR's flagship news portal. In the past, he has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor on the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar during the Iraq war.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, and editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

The meeting was highly anticipated, and it didn't disappoint — particularly from Lilly King's point of view. One day after King spoke bluntly about rival Yuliya Efimova's doping offenses, she beat Efimova to win a gold medal in the women's 100-meter breaststroke at Rio's Summer Olympics.

"I'm proud to be competing clean and doing what is right," King said after the race. "But I need to respect the IOC's decision" — referring to the announcement over the weekend that Efimova would be allowed to compete.

Olympics fans enjoyed some great weather on the opening weekend of the Summer Games in Rio de Janeiro — and they also saw some amazing results Sunday.

But what about the locals? Over the weekend, thousands of them visited a new park that's hosting a large party for the next two weeks. While the megacity of Rio is notoriously hard to sum up, on Sunday we saw many people who were happy to check out Rio's renovated waterfront and its Olympic flame.

It was a match that lived up to its billing: the U.S., the world's top-ranked women's soccer team, taking on No. 3 France in a close contest that saw stellar play from both goalkeepers and ended with a 1-0 American victory.

The tense tone was set in the first minutes, with both offenses putting the ball into the penalty area for scoring chances – and both defenses quickly defusing those threats. That pattern held for all of the first half, and for part of the second.

Rio is welcoming the world to the Summer Olympics — and after months of negative news and setbacks, organizers for these games on Friday finally got to do what the city's famous for: Throw a party, in the form of an hours-long Opening Ceremony.

Caetano Veloso and Gilberto Gil are headlining a show that's heavy on samba drums and dancing, highlighting Brazil's history and heritage. And the Parade of Nations kicked off with 207 delegations following their flag-bearers into Rio's venerable Maracana Stadium.

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