WJSU’s Carter-Simmers loses her battle against breast cancer

WJSU General Manager Gina Carter-Simmers, a fierce advocate in the war against breast cancer who organized the Beauty of Cancer photo exhibit and Wig Project, lost her valiant battle Tuesday night.

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If that case of diarrhea just doesn't get better, your heartburn drug could be the reason.

The Food and Drug Administration just warned doctors and consumers that popular medicines called proton pump inhibitors may raise the risk for chronic diarrhea caused by Clostridium difficile, a bacterium that you'd rather not have colonizing your intestines.

Spooning strained peas into a baby is the traditional way to start solid food. But babies might be better off feeding themselves.

That's the surprising result of a new study that compared the food preferences and weight of babies who fed themselves finger food with those who were spoon-fed.

Both groups of children had equal exposure to snack foods. But the babies who fed themselves preferred carbohydrates like toast, pasta or potatoes, while the spoon-fed children went for sweets when given a choice.

Mitt Romney can take solace Wednesday in the words of Mark Hanna, the 19th century Ohio industrialist and political boss who once famously said: "There are two things that are important in politics, money and I can't remember the second."

Argentina's president Cristina Fernández de Kirchner said the country would file a complaint with the United Nations about Britain's "militarization" of the South Atlantic.

This is all part of a recent escalation of the two countries' long-running dispute about the Falkland Islands. Reuters reports:

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Is Komen's Image Beyond Repair?

Feb 8, 2012

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There was a decline last year in the already "small" number of Muslim-Americans indicted for violent terrorist plots and the rate of radicalization among that group remains "far less than many feared" after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, a researcher at North Carolina's Triangle Center on Terrorism and Homeland Security reports today.

What did a Cobb salad and a chicken salad have in common that have made them the latest entries in a big ongoing food safety recall?

Teen pregnancies are at their lowest rate in nearly 40 years, according to the latest data from the Guttmacher Institute, a research organization focused on sexual and reproductive health.

One week after pausing with about 40 feet to go, Russian scientists today announced that they have successfully drilled through two miles of ice to reach Lake Vostok — a body of water the size of New Jersey that hasn't been touched for millions of years.

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