Second Night Of Unrest In Milwaukee Following Police Shooting Saturday

Milwaukee saw a second night of unrest on Sunday following a fatal police shooting this weekend. Sunday's protests were smaller and less destructive than the previous night's, although some violence continued and one person was shot and wounded under unknown circumstances.The weekend's demonstrations and rioting were prompted by the police killing of a 23-year-old black man, identified by police as Sylville Smith, on Saturday. Smith ran from police during a traffic stop. Police say he was...
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It's touted as the "world's highest and longest" glass-bottom bridge, elegantly stretched between two mountain peaks in central China's Hunan province.

And as of this weekend, it's open to visitors. Now, one can walk the 470-yard length of the glass bridge, which is positioned a vertigo-inducing 328 yards above the ground, as China's state-run news agency Xinhua reported.

The U.S. women's basketball team trounced Spain, 101-72, on Saturday, winning their sixth consecutive gold and their 49th straight Olympic game.

The American women so overpowered their opponents that the tournament was almost certainly the least competitive event at the Rio games, which end on Sunday.

The average margin of victory for the U.S. in their Olympic games was nearly 40 points, and the closest game was a 19-point victory over France in the semifinals. Since 1996, the American have only had one game where they won by fewer than 10 points.

Boxer Shakur Stevenson lost the gold medal to Cuba's Robeisy Ramirez at Rio's Summer Olympics Saturday, in a split decision that left the American distraught after their three-round fight.

"I felt Robeisy won the last 30 seconds," Stevenson said later.

The two rounds that Stevenson, 19, lost in this gold medal bout were the first he'd lost in Rio.

The fact that he'd just won the highest Olympic medal for the U.S. men's boxing team since 2004 did little to console Stevenson.

"I don't look at it as an accomplishment," he said. "I look at it as a loss."

Bill Clinton turned 70 on Friday. From his small town beginnings in Arkansas to the Oval Office in Washington, Clinton's career has been anything but a smooth ride. It could be tested again if his wife, Hillary Clinton, is elected president — becoming the first presidential spouse to be elected president in their own right.

Nothing has represented Clinton's legacy more than the Clinton foundation, but questions about potential conflicts of interest — as well as Clinton's use of a private email server — have been a nagging thorn in the side of Clinton's presidential run.

"Ryan Lochte is too much with us," William Wordsworth might have written if he were covering the Summer Olympics in Rio.

Okay, I admit it: William Wordsworth would never have written that. But that's the sentiment that hung over Rio this week, as the temporary community that the Olympics creates every two years found itself unexpectedly distracted from its normal duty of watching talented and dedicated people introduce their dreams to Olympic reality.

Since a coup attempt just over a month ago failed to dislodge the government of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, his government has launched a sweeping purge that has impacted tens of thousands over a wide cross section of Turkish society.

More than 40,029 people have been detained and 20,355 arrested since the coup attempt on July 15, Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim said in a televised interview on Wednesday. And while many of them have been released, "a total of 5,187 are still remanded in custody."

It looks like it could be a cartoon character, but it's real. And this little squid is making waves on the internet.

Researchers from the Nautilus exploration vessel were cruising along the deep sea floor off California's coast when they came upon the bright purple creature with giant, stuffed-animal-like eyes.

"Whoa!" they exclaim in unison.

Firefighters are gaining ground on the aggressive Blue Cut wildfire in Southern California's San Bernardino National Forest that has destroyed nearly 100 homes and more than 200 other structures.

It's one of several major fires impacting the drought-stricken state. And as NPR's Kirk Siegler tells our Newscast unit, hundreds of the 80,000 put under evacuation notice are now cleared to return home, but "controlling a blaze like this will take weeks." He explains:

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and in The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

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WJS-U Should Check it Out

In a damning report released Wednesday, the Department of Justice details the ways in which the Baltimore Police Department has violated the rights of the people its officers are sworn to protect.

The problems detailed in the 163-page report are broad and deep. But they're specific, too: a "pattern or practice" of discrimination is, of course, made of moments.

To be clear, the report emphasizes that this is not a case of a few bad apples. The problems are systemic — supervisors, policies, weak investigations and officer culture all play a role, the DOJ found.

After a Justice Department investigation excoriated the Baltimore Police Department for discriminatory practices and systemic failures, the city's mayor says there is "a very long journey ahead."

At a press conference Wednesday, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said the report — which described repeated and even routine racial discrimination, unconstitutional arrests and use of excessive force — was "challenging to hear."

Eric Essex interview

Aug 10, 2016

Day 4 from the DNC

Aug 10, 2016

Day 3 from the DNC

Aug 9, 2016
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