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A South Korean court on Friday tacked on another eight years to former President Park Geun-hye's sentence for illegally receiving funds from a state agency and breaking election laws.

More than 100 former student athletes have reported "firsthand accounts of sexual misconduct" committed by Ohio State University physician Richard Strauss nearly two decades ago, the school announced on Friday.

Officials said the allegations date from 1979 to 1997. They include students who, at the time, were varsity players in 14 sports and patients of Student Health Services.

Amy Powell's five-year run as head of Paramount Studios' television division came to a halt on Thursday.

She was suddenly ousted after an internal investigation of her alleged use of racially charged language, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Paramount CEO Jim Gianopulos announced Powell's dismissal in a memo to staff.

Music and politics have always been intertwined, from "Yankee Doodle" to "A Change is Gonna Come." And that's true in Zimbabwe, too — a country that is now facing a historic political transition.

The United Kingdom is counting its butterflies today — and will keep going for the next three weeks.

The ninth annual Big Butterfly Campaign kicks off today, with a big boost from a legendary voice.

"I did it in my garden," Sir David Attenborough intoned. "Where are you going to do yours?"

The ask is simple: Anybody in the U.K. can download an app or print out a chart that shows pictures of common butterflies.

The father of two students who survived the Parkland school shooting in February was fatally shot Tuesday while working at his convenience store.

Ayub Ali, 61, was restocking shelves at Aunt Molly's Food Store in North Lauderdale, Fla., when a man with a gun walked in around 12:40 p.m and lingered in the aisles.

Copyright 2018 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

Ordering a "grande four-pump, nonfat, no-whip, extra-hot mocha" is a mouthful for any hot beverage nerd, but for deaf people, it can be hard to order just a simple cup of black coffee. Global coffee behemoth Starbucks' "Signing Store Project," launching in Washington, D.C. in October, aims to change that.

Adam Novsam, a deaf utility analyst at Starbucks headquarters in Seattle, knows firsthand how frustrating it can be to accomplish even the most basic transactions in the hearing world.

Not since a deadly famine was ravaging North Korea in 1997 has the country seen its economy contract at such a large rate as it did last year. After a couple of years of growth, the country's estimated gross domestic product went reeling in the other direction in 2017, shrinking 3.5 percent, according to South Korea's central bank.

The Trump administration has one week left to meet a court-ordered deadline to reunite over 2,000 children separated at the border from their families suspected of entering the U.S. illegally.

Logistically, it's going to be tough for the government. The children were sent to dozens of different shelters and foster homes around the United States, in many cases, thousands of miles from their detained parents.

Then there are dozens more parents who've already been deported without their children, further complicating the reunification process.

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